skip to Main Content
They All Want To Be Me

My company motto is ‘Always Imitated.  Never Equaled.’  That’s because the US-made quality that we manufacture and carry is not duplicated by any other seller, and new products we design and introduce are often copied and reproduced in lesser quality knock off versions.

From pictures to product, it doesn’t take long before we launch something to have it copied.  I think the shortest time for someone to copy one of our new products was 4 hours after it launched!  Most times it is flattering to know it occurs because you are the best and that the reason other people copy me is because they are not able do it for themselves.  On the other hand, we have worked hard to be the best and sometimes it’s not so nice to have others benefitting from your hard work by presenting it as their own. Heck, some of them even use my name to try to get business.

10 years ago we began doing two-color electrodes.  We experimented with several ways to do this, and now we’re going to get a bit technical for the geeks.  But here are some of the types of multi-colored electrodes we have produced.

– Proper vacuum and gas mixes to cause gases to separate within the same discharge tube.   In this electrode, nitrogen separates into pale blue and orange as shown at left.  Hydrogen glows blue with red showing where electrodes narrow.  This is one of our rod electrodes c. 2001.

 

 

– Two or more connected glass envelopes, each of which houses a different gas.  These were always fun and jaw dropping, but a bit more technically difficult.  One of our anal internal electrodes with both argon and neon, with ‘pearl’ bumps and large bulb ‘stop’ c. 2006.

 

 

two tone violet wand dom electrode–  Glass with its own fluorescent properties.  This resulted in electrodes in which the glass glows one color and the gas inside it glows another.  Cerium doped quartz glass glows light electric blue, and ‘vaseline’ type glass glows green.  These were combined with blue, pink, red and purple gas. This internal dom vaginal electrode at left, we made with non-UV cerium doped quartz glass and neon gas.  My favorite electrode we’ve ever made, c. 2004.  It was the Limited Edition Electrode for 2006.

 

We didn’t invent these techniques, as the processes for making discharge tubes of this type were invented by Henrich Geissler, a German glassblower and physicist in 1855.  We simply apply his techniques to the making of violet wand electrodes.  And making some very special things for ourselves.  If you are a master glassblower, it is possible to make a violet wand electrode as intricate, colorful and as awe-inspiring as anything you can dream up.  From time to time we still make short runs of these types of electrodes for friends or colleagues or by special request.  But work of this level of skill does not come cheaply or easily.

Look up ‘Geissler tubes’ for some fascinating glowing glass work past and present, in an art form that has all but disappeared.  We’re keeping the art alive for a definitely different purpose!

 

Back To Top