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Safer Set Ups

Safer Wand Setups

by Violetwanda

One of the concerns for violet wand safety, is the potential for a draw on household line current if an accident occurs.  While it need not be a concern with proper equipment in good repair and under normal situations, it is something to keep in mind as you begin to experiment and expand with your violet wand play.  A draw on 110v mains or household voltage can potentially be fatal and you don’t want to employ a setup that could potentiallymake it easier for a ground fault to occur.

So we’re going to look at different setups with your violet wand play, and safety checkpoints that are present, and show you how to keep your safety points working for you.

A ground fault is when electricity travels from the household electrical outlet, straight through the wand without becoming transformed into the high frequency, high voltage current that is safe(er) to play with from a kink perspective.  With good equipment in good repair, a ground fault won’t occur unless you throw your wand in the bathtub.  However, if a wand’s wiring is damaged, deteriorated or there is another circumstance that could cause a ground fault, it increases the possibility of this occurring.  And that can be fatal.  This article will show how different setups can inadvertently remove safety points, and how to put safety points back into your setup to keep your play as safe as you desire.


 

When setting up to play, there are a wide number of possible safety points that you could incorporate and that you should keep in mind as you experiment and become more advanced with violet wand play.·  Removing some safety points is not necessarily ‘dangerous’ except if you remove too many safety points and don’t integrate others to back them up. 

NOTE:  This is a VERY in-depth article that goes into every point at which ground fault protections could be compromised and how to compensate for them in your setup.  It’s an advanced-education article and of interest to those who really want to dig into violet wand information as they experiment and develop play styles, techniques or tools.

Possible SAFETY POINTS

The building:

  • Properly wired electrical wiring in good repair
  • Properly wired and grounded outlet

Your wand:

  • grounded plug
  • intact internal components and wiring

Your toys:

  • glass or gapped electrodes
  • gapped accessories

Your space:

  • Absence of path to ground

 

Let’s begin with the violet wand.  As the center of your setup, it contains the most important safety points – the components that transform household mains current into a high voltage/high frequency version.  The first safety point is the good condition of the internal compomnents of your equipment, which allows this transformation of current to take place reliably and consistently without incident. 

 

The second safety point of your violet wand is its 3 prong grounded plug.  In case of a fault, the current would be given a path to run to ground through the ground pole of the plug and not to the end user (unless grounded themselves as you’ll see later). 

(In addition, A minor safety point of the spark gap of the magnetic contact assembly (the Wagner’s Hammer) is also present as the current jumps back and forth across the gap and Household 110v current can’t jump the gap.  However, if the contacts were misaligned or closed, it would provide a potential pathway for household current.  Another minor safety point is an intact cord which is not old or stiffened or kinked, since a kinked or cracked cord could short between the positive and negative wires.)

 

Setup 1

Since new Tesla-type violet wands have two major safety points built in, the grounded plug and integrity of their components, this means owners of new wands of this type have less to worry about as far as safety regarding the potential of a ground fault; they can plug their wand in and go to it.  The most common accessory used by newer wand users is a glass violet wand electrode.  

Since violet wand play is highly customizable, many people have developed a preferred way of setting up to play.  The most common way to play is to plug your grounded three prong plug violet wand into the wall outlet and use a glass electrode.  This is the basic setup.

In this BASIC setup, there are two obvious safety points 1) the wand has a grounded plug. and 2) the wand has intact components and wiring.  There is also a third safety point, 3)the glass electrode provides a buffer that will keep household current from the end user in case of a fault. So wand users with this setup are incorporating three points of safety in the event of a potential ground fault and are covered by all three of these ‘safety points’.

 

In this set up, which is most common, there are 3 separate safety points.  Glass electrodes provide a safety point, because household mains current can’t pass through the glass.  That’s why glass is used as an effective electrical insulator.  So if any ground fault would occur, the glass electrodes provide a stop at the last point the current could reach the human body. Glass electrodes still allow violet wand net discharge gurrent to pass through. 

 


Setup 2

Gapped metal accessories provide almost the same stop as a glass electrode.

This is because household/mains current is of a voltage and frequency that can’t jump spaces.  These spaces, called safety gaps or just gaps, provide another safety point for you to work with.  The purpose of all the safety points are to keep household mains current from reaching the human body.  Gapped metal accessories come in MANY types, as cables, extension cables, body contact cables, and metal electrodes that insert into the wand. And the gaps can be of mulitiple types, silicone or even air.  Anything that breaks or interrupts the straight conductive line that household mains electricity could travel, is a safety gap.  Even ball chain has some current limiting properties.


Setup 3

What about ungapped metal accessories?  Aren’t they UNSAFE?

SSC people (Safe, Sane and Consensual)  incorporate as many safety points into their setup as possible.  RACK players may play with removing one or two, because they know how many points of safety they have, and/or how to compensate by incorporating other safety points. Lets see how this works with an ungapped metal electrode.

 

Note that there are still 2 safety points of use, a grounded plug, an intact wand whose wiring and internal components are intact.  So RACK (Risk Aware Consensual Kink) and advanced players who know that they still have additional safety points, may choose to play with ungapped metal accessories or electrodes, since the potential for a ground fault with the built in safety points remains low.


 

Setup 4

However, one of the safety points has been removed, so SSC players who wish to try ungapped metal accessories or electrodes, less experienced players and newer players may want to replace the 3rd safety point.  This can be easily done with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruptor).

Notice we again have 3 safety points, and that the Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter effectively substitutes for the gapped metal electrode or accessory.


 

GFCIs are helpful as part of your setup in many other ways.  A Ground Fault Circuit Interupter shuts down within milliseconds if there is any fault to ground, and household electricity is stopped at the GFCI rather than further down our setup.  This can be a welcome relief if you do not know about the rest of your setup.  Because this isn’t all of your setup.  There’s more of your setup that you work with that you can’t even see.

 

(KEEP READING by clicking ‘Next’.  THERE’s MORE!  hugs, Wanda)


 

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