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Fear of electricity is a primal fear.  There is something about the sizzle and spark and flinch of flesh that makes our genetic memories cower as our ancient hominid ancestors did at the power and destruction of lightning.  Even after they learned to control fire, not until recently has man been in control of such power from the sky and could learn to overcome the inherent fear.

A large percentage of people fear electricity, which surely has to be one reason that electroplay is such a small niche fetish, and violet wands..with their very visible little ‘lightning bolts’ are an even smaller niche.  But for those who do not have fear of electricity, or have overcome it, they live in a lucky modern world to realize how amazing violet wands can be.

How do you get over a fear of electricity?  How do you get someone over it whom is interested in the wand or you want to play with?  To allay fears during scene negotiations?

During negotiations, if your partner is balking at the electro-idea, communicating the point that they will have a lovely time can go a long way in reassuring someone with a fear of electricity.  Describing what you’ll do and how far you’ll take them at first allows them to live with the picture and the imagined scene in their mind.  Start with a slow picture!  Telling someone that violet wands can be used for fireplay, branding, needles, doesn’t help with an imagination that is already ready to run amok.  Describe how violet wands can be used to caress and tickle, describe the little softest sparks with gentle terms like butterfly wings.  Talk about the output as sparks or fizzles or some other nonthreatening term that they are going to feel them, rather than ‘the electricity’.

Allow the subject to look at and handle your gear.  Perhaps have them maintain it.  Describe what each piece is and what its for.  Put emphasis on the softer end accessories, and downplay the ones that feel like a blowtorch melting your flesh.

Often, people will already have had a chance to see a violet wand in action, and maybe even held their arm out to test the sensation.  But because violet wand techniques and accessories can feel so different, when they tested it, it may not have been one of the sensations that they’d appreciate.  It helps to tell them there are many, many more.

Techniques to begin with:

Start slow with the actual use, just as you started slow with the imagined picture. Here are two very helpful starting techniques.

Use a roller:  The massage roller electrode is the softest one available.  They are so soft that some people can not feel them on their thicker skin. They are also very pretty.  Put the roller in the wand, turn the wand down low, turn the lights down to an intimate setting.  You want the concept of a candlelit bath or a comforting campfire with a light sound and show from the wand.  Set your wand down and continue the softness of the setting, allowing the subject to reach out and touch the roller head on their own.  (thanks to Traveling Fool for suggesting the roller as a means to entice new electroverts!)  Offer a reward for making that first touch.  Once they do, and feel very little from the roller, the consternation on a fearful face relaxes in pleased surprise.

Use Indirect:  You’re the human shield through which the sparks are passing through, and it would hurt you before it would hurt them.  So you are showing them it is safely coming through you first.  Turn the wand down very low, tuck in your cable, set the wand out of sight.  Entice the person to touch you, don’t they want to touch you?  Work it so that all they want to do is touch you, their whole being wants to touch you, and only that tiny, little fizzing spark is in their way.

Both of these use a desensitization method and positive thinking, two useful methods in overcoming any sort of fear or phobia.

Working so closely with electricity for so long, in 2008 I took a nice hit from household current and didn’t have ‘one hand in pocket’.  Though we have an insulating floor in the shop, it gave me a nasty jolt as it tried to find a path through me. I’d forgotten that my pet tiger..who I love, still was a tiger with wild tiger instincts after all.  It can take you aback.  It wouldn’t have done to be afraid of electricity in this business, no, but for a while afterward, I did have to take a second to mentally prepare before sticking my arm to test something..the hub couldn’t just jab sparky things at me indiscriminately without preamble.  Sometimes that resurfaces with new things we test.  The hub gets jolted frequently, so much so that we don’t even put him on the ‘X days without an accident’ tally.  Those were mostly from the antique violet rays, they do not have the safest construction even when new and pristine, let alone 80 years later.

I’ve seen two people drop from wand faults that resulted in a potentially serious hit. One came in contact with the wagner’s hammer spark.  This can occur if there is a crack in a wand body.  The other was from a wand fault (a poorly wired wand) that delivered household which could have been fatal.  Both types of accidents can be completely avoided by playing with well-made or expertly rewired wands, using a GFCI, and making sure your wand is properly grounded.

These are very low incidences over my..ouch..34 years of using high frequency devices.  Violet wand play is very very low risk, but Im surely going to run across an accident or injury sometime during that long a time period, and even experience a few myself.  We’ve put 10,000 Violet Wanda wands into peoples hands over the years, and not one report of injury.  That’s an astounding record.  I have one permanent vw mark made in 2003 that we attributed to the toy design bumping up the output (and which helped lead to the development of MJOLNIR output boosting tools).  Frankly, there has been nothing to be afraid of.

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